HMS Hood

Background

[Wikipedia, 22 May 2013]

HMS Hood (pennant number 51) was the last battlecruiser built for the Royal Navy. Commissioned in 1920, she was named after the 18th century Admiral Samuel Hood. One of four Admiral-class battlecruisers ordered in mid-1916, Hood had serious design limitations, though her design was drastically revised after the Battle of Jutland and improved while she was under construction. For this reason she was the only ship of her class to be completed. Hood was involved in a number of showing the flag exercises between her commissioning in 1920 and the outbreak of war in 1939, including training exercises in the Mediterranean Sea and a circumnavigation of the globe with the Special Service Squadron in 1923 and 1924. She was attached to the Mediterranean Fleet following the outbreak of the Second Italo-Abyssinian War. When the Spanish Civil War broke out, Hood was officially assigned to the Mediterranean Fleet until she had to return to Britain in 1939 for an overhaul. By this time, advances in naval gunnery had reduced Hood's usefulness. She was scheduled to undergo a major rebuild in 1941 to correct these issues, but the outbreak of World War II in September 1939 forced the ship into service without the upgrades.

When war with Germany was declared Hood was operating in the area around Iceland, and she spent the next several months hunting between Iceland and the Norwegian Sea for German commerce raiders and blockade runners. After a brief overhaul of her propulsion system, she sailed as the flagship of Force H, and participated in the destruction of the French Fleet at Mers-el-Kebir. Relieved as flagship of Force H, Hood was dispatched to Scapa Flow, and operated in the area as a convoy escort and later as a defence against a potential German invasion fleet. In May 1941, she and the battleship Prince of Wales were ordered to intercept the German battleship Bismarck and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen which was en route to the Atlantic where she was to attack convoys. On 24 May 1941, early in the Battle of the Denmark Strait, Hood was struck by several German shells and exploded; the loss had a profound effect on the British people. Prime Minister Winston Churchill ordered the Royal Navy to "sink the Bismarck!", and they fulfilled his command on 26–27 May.

The Royal Navy conducted two inquiries into the reasons for the ship's quick demise. The first, held very quickly after the ship's loss, concluded that Hood's aft magazine had exploded after one of Bismarck's shells penetrated the ship's armour. A second inquiry was held after complaints were received that the first board had failed to consider alternative explanations, such as an explosion of the ship's torpedoes. While much more thorough than the first board, it concurred with the first board's conclusion. Despite the official explanation, some historians continued to believe that the torpedoes caused the ship's loss while others proposed an accidental explosion inside one of the ship's gun turrets that reached down into the magazine. Other historians have focused on the cause of the magazine explosion. The discovery of the ship's wreck in 2001 confirmed the conclusion of both boards, although the exact reason why the magazines detonated will forever be a mystery as that area of the ship was entirely destroyed in the explosion

Gray / Grey crew

[from the HMS Hood Association web-site]

Surname

First Names

Rank/Rate

Service Number

Time Frame

Source

Gray

Samuel Leonard

Not known

KX85556

30 August 1935 to 23 November 1937

 

Gray

Alfred E E

Able Seaman

P/J92162

Lost in sinking of ship, 24 May 1941

 

Gray

John C

Ordinary Seaman

P/JX162383

Lost in sinking of ship, 24 May 1941

 

Gray, Samuel Leonard

{to be defined}

Gray, Alfred Ernest Edward (1902-1941)

[information from the GRAY genealogy web-site]

Alfred was born on 29 December 1902 in Southwark to parents Alfred Ernest and Laura Beaufoy Gray (nee Brown). He was the husband of Emily Laura Gray (nee Thorpe), of Havant, Hampshire (England). He died aged 38.

Gray, John Charles

John was born on 15 November 1922 in Richmond, Surrey (England) to John and Violet Gray. The family later lived in Rosyth, Fife (Scotland). He was 18 years old at the time of his death.

 

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